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Wales Poetry

Tribanau
Serjeant Parry, the eminent barrister) says: "The followin...

The Hall Of Cynddylan
The Hall of Cynddylan is gloomy to-night, I weep, for th...

Gwilym Glyn And Ruth Of Dyffryn
In the depth of yonder valley, Where the fields are bright...

The Lily And The Rose
Once I saw two flowers blossom In a garden 'neath the h...

The Praise And Commendation Of A Good Woman
As a wise child excells the sceptr'd fool Who of conceit a...

The Day Of Judgment
was a native of Anglesea, and entered the Welsh Church...

Song To Arvon
by the Rev. Evan Evans, a Clergyman of the Church of Eng...

The Vengeance Of Owain {96}
Gruffydd ab Cynan, Prince of Gwynedd, or North Wales, and ...

An Ode On The Death Of Hoel
of the sixth century. He was himself a soldier, and d...

The Golden Goblet, In Imitation Of Gothe
There was a king in Mon, {62} A true lover to his grave; ...

The Lord Of Clas
The Lord of Clas to his hunting is gone, Over plain and...

The World And The Sea: A Comparison
Like the world and its dread changes Is the ocean when it ...

Glan Geirionydd
. One time upon a summer day I saunter'd on the shor...

To The Lark
"Sentinel of the morning light! Reveller of the...

The Cuckoo's Tale
Hail, bird of sweet melody, heav'n is thy home; With the...

An Ode To The Thunder
his bardic name of Dafydd Ionawr, was born in the year 1...

Dafydd Ap Gwilym's Address To Morfydd After She Married His Rival
Too long I've loved the fickle maid, My love is turned to ...

The Farmer's Prayer
poems of the "Good Vicar Prichard of Llandovery" would be ...

The Dawn
Streaking the mantle of deep night The rays of light ...

Dafydd Ap Gwilym's Invocation To The Summer To Visit Glamorganshire,
Where he spent many happy years at the hospitable mansion o...



To May






Category: The Beautiful.

the following and several other poems in this collection. He was a
native of Cardiganshire, and, following the example of his countrymen, he
assumed the bardic name of _Daniel Ddu_. He was born in 1792, and died
in 1846. His compositions were very miscellaneous, and appeared
separately, but the whole were afterwards published in one volume by Mr.
W. Rees, of Llandovery, in 1831. This poet's writings are distinguished
by great pathos, and a truthful description of nature.]

How fair and fragrant art thou, May!
Replete with leaf and verdure,
How sweet the blossom of the thorn
Which so enriches nature,
The bird now sings upon the bush,
Or soars through fields of azure.

The earth absorbs the genial rays
Which vivify the summer,
The busy bee hums on his way
Exhausting every flower,
Returning to its earthen nest
Laden with honied treasure.

How cheerful are the signs of May,
The lily sweet and briar,
Perfuming every shady way
Beside the warbling river;
And thou, gay cuckoo! hast returned
To usher in the summer.

How pleasant is the cuckoo's song
Which floats along the meadow,
How rich the sight of woodland green,
And pastures white and yellow,
The lark now soars into the heights
And pours her notes so mellow.

To welcome May, let thousands hie
At the sweet dawn of morning,
The winter cold has left the sky,
The sun is mildly beaming,
The dew bright sparkles on the grass,
All nature is rejoicing.

Let May be crown'd the best of months
Of all the passing year,
Let her be deck'd with floral wreaths,
And fed with juice and nectar,
Let old and young forsake the town
And shout a welcome to her.





Next: The Dawn

Previous: The Flowers Of Spring



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