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The World And The Sea: A Comparison
Like the world and its dread changes Is the ocean when it ...

The Farmer's Prayer
poems of the "Good Vicar Prichard of Llandovery" would be ...

The Song Of The Fisherman's Wife
Restless wave! be still and quiet, Do not heed the win...

Llywarch Hen's Lament On Cynddylan
Taliesin in the sixth century. He was engaged at the batt...

Farewell To Wales
The voice of thy streams in my spirit I bear; Farewell; ...

Ode To Cambria
Cambria, I love thy genius bold; Thy dreadful rites, and...

The Day Of Judgment
was a native of Anglesea, and entered the Welsh Church...

A Bridal Song
Wilt thou not waken, bride of May, While the flowers are...

The Vengeance Of Owain {96}
Gruffydd ab Cynan, Prince of Gwynedd, or North Wales, and ...

To The Daisy
Oh, flower meek and modest That blooms of all the soonest,...

Translated By The Rev William Evans
God doth withhold no good from those Who meekly fear him ...

Taliesin's Prophecy
A voice from time departed, yet floats thy hills among,...

Gwilym Glyn And Ruth Of Dyffryn
In the depth of yonder valley, Where the fields are bright...

The Mountain Galloway
My tried and trusty mountain steed, Of Aberteivi's hardy...

Tribanau
Serjeant Parry, the eminent barrister) says: "The followin...

An Address To The Summer
of Llanbadarn Fawr, Cardiganshire, and was born about ...

The Bard's Long-tried Affection For Morfydd
All my lifetime I have been Bard to Morfydd, "golden m...

From The Hymns Of The Rev William Williams, Pantycelyn
he inherited from his ancestors, was born in the parish of...

The Grove Of Broom
The girl of nobler loveliness Than countess decked in go...

Concerning The Divine Providence
...



Dafydd Ap Gwilym's Address To Morfydd After She Married His Rival






Category: The Religious.

Too long I've loved the fickle maid,
My love is turned to grief and pain;
In vain delusive hopes I stray'd,
Through days that ne'er will dawn again;
And she, in beauty like the dawn,
From me has now her heart withdrawn!
A constant suitor--on her ear
My sweetest melodies I pour'd;
Where'er she wander'd I was near;
For her whose face my soul ador'd
My wealth I madly spent in wine,
And gorgeous jewels of the mine.
I deck'd her arms with lovely chains,
With bracelets wove of slender gold;
I sang her charms in varied strains,
Her praise to every minstrel told:
The bards of distant Keri know
That she is spotless as the snow.
These proofs of love I hoped might bind
My Morfydd to be ever true:
Alas! to deep despair consign'd,
My bosom's blighted hopes I rue,
And the base craft that gave her charms,
Oh, anguish! to another's arms!





Next: From The Hymns Of The Rev William Williams, Pantycelyn

Previous: The Cuckoo's Tale



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