VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.storiespoetry.com Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Collection of Stories - Famous Stories - Short Stories - Wales Poetry - Yiddish Tales

Stories

The Senior Proctor's Wooing:
A TALE OF TWO CONTINENTS. I. I was positively blinded...

Montbleru; Or The Thief
By G. De Montbleru. _Of one named Montbleru, who at a fair...

Indiscretion Reproved, But Not Punished
By The Provost Of Wastennes. _Of a woman who heard her hus...

The Husband Pandar To His Own Wife
By Monseigneur _Of a knight of Burgundy, who was marvellou...

The Husband In The Clothes-chest
By Monseigneur De Beauvoir. _Of a great lord of this kingd...

Good Measure! [80]
By Michault De Changy. _Of a young German girl, aged fifte...

The Woman With Three Husbands
By Philippe De Laon. _Of a "fur hat" of Paris, who wished ...

A Good Dog
_Of a foolish and rich village cure who buried his dog in the...

A Bargain In Horns
By Monseigneur De Fiennes. _Of a labourer who found a man ...

The Lost Ring
By Monseigneur De Commesuram. _Of two friends, one of whom...

The Monk-doctor
By Monseigneur _The second story, related by Duke Philip, ...

The Curate Of Churnside
Walter Dene, deacon, in his faultless Oxford clerical coat ...

Foolish Fear
By Monseigneur Philippe Vignier. _Of a young man of Rouen,...

On The Blind Side
By Monseigneur Le Duc. _Of a knight of Picardy who went to...

How A Good Wife Went On A Pilgrimage
By Messire Timoleon Vignier. _Of a good wife who pretended...

The Incapable Lover
By Messire Miohaut De Changy. _Of the meeting assigned to ...

The Duel With The Buckle-strap
By Philippe De Laon. _The fifth story relates two judgment...

The Scarlet Backside
By Pierre David. _Of one who saw his wife with a man to wh...

The Lawyer's Wife Who Passed The Line
By Monseigneur De Commesuram. _Of a clerk of whom his mist...

The Calf
By Monseigneur de la Roche _Of a Dutchman, who at all hour...



At Work








By Monseigneur De La Roche.

_Of a squire who saw his mistress, whom he greatly loved, between
two other gentlemern, and did not notice that she had hold of both of
them till another knight informed him of the matter as you will hear._


A kind and noble gentleman, who wished to spend his time in the service
of the Court of Love, devoted himself, heart, body, and goods, to a fair
and honest damsel who well deserved it, and who was specially suited to
do what she liked with men; and his amour with her lasted long. And he
thought that he stood high in her good graces, though to say the truth,
he was no more a favourite than the others, of whom there were many.

It happened one day that this worthy gentleman found his lady, by
chance, in the embrasure of a window, between a knight and a squire, to
whom she was talking. Sometimes she would speak to one apart and not let
the other hear, another time she did the same to the other, to please
both of them, but the poor lover was greatly vexed and jealous, and did
not dare to approach the group.

The only thing to do was to walk away from her, although he desired her
presence more than anything else in the world. His heart told him that
this conversation would not tend to his advantage, in which he was not
far wrong. For, if his eyes had not been blinded by affection, he could
easily have seen what another, who was not concerned, quickly perceived,
and showed him, in this wise.

When he saw and knew for certain that the lady had neither leisure nor
inclination to talk to him, he retired to a couch and lay down, but he
could not sleep.

Whilst he was thus sulking, there came a gentleman, who saluted all the
company, and seeing that the damsel was engaged, withdrew to the recess
where the squire was lying sleepless upon the couch; and amongst other
conversation the squire said,

"By my faith, monseigneur, look towards the window; there are some
people who are making themselves comfortable. Do you not see how
pleasantly they are talking."

"By St. John, I see them," said the knight, "and see that they are doing
something more than talking."

"What else?" said the other.

"What else? Do you not see that she has got hold of both of them?"

"Got hold of them!"

"Truly yes, poor fellow! Where are your eyes? But there is a great
difference between the two, for the one she holds in her left hand is
neither so big nor so long as that which she holds in her right hand."

"Ha!" said the squire, "you say right. May St. Anthony burn the wanton;"
and you may guess that he was not well pleased.

"Take no heed," said the knight, "and bear your wrong as patiently
as you can. It is not here that you have to show your courage: make a
virtue of necessity."

Having thus spoken, the worthy knight approached the window where the
three were standing, and noticed by chance that the knight on the left,
hand, was standing on tip-toe, attending to what the fair damsel and the
squire were saying and doing.

Giving him a slight tap on his hat, the knight said,

"Mind your own business in the devil's name, and don't trouble about
other people."

The other withdrew, and began to laugh, but the damsel, who was not the
sort of woman to care about trifles, scarcely showed any concern, but
quietly let go her hold without brushing or changing colour, though she
was sorry in her heart to let out of her hand what she could have well
used in another place.

As you may guess, both before and after that time, either of those two
would most willingly have done her a service, and the poor, sick lover
was obliged to be a witness of the greatest misfortune which could
happen to him, and his poor heart would have driven him to despair,
if reason had not come to his help, and caused him to abandon his love
affairs, out of which he had never derived any benefit.


*****





Next: The Use Of Dirty Water

Previous: The Exchange



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 3241


Untitled Document