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Anne Cleaveland.
Anne was the daughter of a wealthy farmer. She had a good N...

Chinese Proverbs.
What is told in the ear is often heard a hundred miles. ...

Anecdotes.
A poor Arabian of the desert was one day asked, how he came...

No Payno Work.
"Little boy, will you help a poor old man up the hill with ...

The Explanation.
Lettice's father was a man of education, a scholar, a gentl...

Story About A Robber.
I will tell you a true story about a robber. A gentleman wa...

The Philosophy Of Relative Existences
In a certain summer, not long gone, my friend Bentley and I...

A Boy Reproved By A Bird.
The sparrows often build their nests under the eaves of hou...

The Child And Flower.
The Atheist in his garden stood, At twilight's pen...

His Wife's Deceased Sister
It is now five years since an event occurred which so color...

Edward And Ellen.
Edward Ford owned a snug little cottage with a small farm s...

The Boy And The Gold Robin.
A bright eyed boy was sleeping upon a bank of blossoming cl...

The Bracelet;
...

A Good Act For Another.
A man was going from Norwich to New London with a loaded te...

Lettice And Catherine,
...

The First Dollar.
I will tell you an affecting story about a young lad by the...

Pledge.
Our hands and our hearts we give To the temperance p...

Benny's First Drawing.
You have perhaps heard of Benjamin West, the celebrated art...

Story About An Indian.
A poor sick man might go to the door of some rich person's ...

Mother's Last Lesson.
"Will you please teach me my verse, mamma, and then kiss me...



THE HAPPY FAMILY.








There are a great many novel sights in the streets of London, for the
cheap entertainment of the people. The family circle of different
animals and birds is an admirable illustration of the peace which
should pervade among families. The proprietor of this little menagerie
calls it, "The Happy Family." The house in which they are kept is a
simple constructed cage. It is a large square hen-coop, placed on a
low hand-cart which a man draws about from one street to another, and
gets a few pennys a day from those who stop to look at the domestic
happiness of his family. Perhaps the first thing you will see, is a
large cat, washing her face, with a number of large rats nestling
around her, like kittens, whilst others are climbing up her back and
playing with her whiskers. In another corner of the room a dove and a
hawk are sitting on the head of a dog which is resting across the neck
of a rabbit. The floor is covered with the oddest social circles
imaginable--weazles and Guinea pigs, and peeping chickens, are putting
their noses together, caressingly. The perches above are covered with
birds whose natural antipathies have been subdued into mutual
affection by the law of kindness. The grave owl is sitting upright,
and meditating in the sun, with a keen-sighted sparrow perched between
his ears trying to open the eyes of the sleepy owl with its sharp
bill.

Children stop to look at this scene, and Mr. Burritt thinks they may
carry away lessons which will do them good. They will think on it on
their way to school, and at home too, when any thing crosses their
will in family or on the play ground.





Next: STORY ABOUT AN INDIAN.

Previous: FLYING THE KITE.



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