The enemies of poise are many and of different origins, both of feeling and of impulse. They all tend, however, toward the same result, the cessation of effort under pretexts more or less specious. It is of no use deceiving ourselves. La... Read more of THE ENEMIES OF POISE at Difficult.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Short Stories

Telling Secrets.
There is a company of girls met together, and what can they...

The Plum Boys.
Two boys were one day on their way from school, and as they...

A Piece Of Red Calico
I was going into town one morning from my suburban residenc...

Anna With A Pleasant Home.
Anna, having obtained leave of her mistress, soon found her...

Jonas And His Horse.
A horse is a noble animal, and is made for the service of m...

My Early Days.
My father's house was indeed a pleasant home; and father wa...

The Saint's Rest.
We've no abiding city here: This may distress the wo...

A Boy Reproved By A Bird.
The sparrows often build their nests under the eaves of hou...

His Wife's Deceased Sister
It is now five years since an event occurred which so color...

The Boy And The Gold Robin.
A bright eyed boy was sleeping upon a bank of blossoming cl...

The Brother And Sister.
(In three Stories.) ...

The Bit Of Garden.
Young children like to have a small piece of land for a gar...

Or The Unexpected Meeting.
I must tell you who were Lettice and Myra. They were the da...

Anna Seeking Employment.
It was a wearisome day to poor Anna, as she walked from squ...

Lettice And Catherine,
...

The Remarkable Wreck Of The Thomas Hyke
It was half-past one by the clock in the office of the Regi...

The Echo.
Little Charles knew nothing about an echo. As he was playin...

Chorus
As the manna lay, on the desert ground, So from day to d...

Or, Honesty Rewarded.
At St. Petersburgh, the birth day of any of the royal famil...

The Trusty Dog.
I am glad to introduce to you, the noble dog whose picture ...



THE HAPPY FAMILY.








There are a great many novel sights in the streets of London, for the
cheap entertainment of the people. The family circle of different
animals and birds is an admirable illustration of the peace which
should pervade among families. The proprietor of this little menagerie
calls it, "The Happy Family." The house in which they are kept is a
simple constructed cage. It is a large square hen-coop, placed on a
low hand-cart which a man draws about from one street to another, and
gets a few pennys a day from those who stop to look at the domestic
happiness of his family. Perhaps the first thing you will see, is a
large cat, washing her face, with a number of large rats nestling
around her, like kittens, whilst others are climbing up her back and
playing with her whiskers. In another corner of the room a dove and a
hawk are sitting on the head of a dog which is resting across the neck
of a rabbit. The floor is covered with the oddest social circles
imaginable--weazles and Guinea pigs, and peeping chickens, are putting
their noses together, caressingly. The perches above are covered with
birds whose natural antipathies have been subdued into mutual
affection by the law of kindness. The grave owl is sitting upright,
and meditating in the sun, with a keen-sighted sparrow perched between
his ears trying to open the eyes of the sleepy owl with its sharp
bill.

Children stop to look at this scene, and Mr. Burritt thinks they may
carry away lessons which will do them good. They will think on it on
their way to school, and at home too, when any thing crosses their
will in family or on the play ground.





Next: STORY ABOUT AN INDIAN.

Previous: FLYING THE KITE.



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