VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.storiespoetry.com Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home - Collection of Stories - Famous Stories - Short Stories - Wales Poetry - Yiddish Tales

Short Stories

Story About An Indian.
A poor sick man might go to the door of some rich person's ...

Pledge.
Our hands and our hearts we give To the temperance p...

The Remarkable Wreck Of The Thomas Hyke
It was half-past one by the clock in the office of the Regi...

Lily Ford.
It was now in the latter part of December--two days more an...

Comfort And Sobriety.
Let me here give you a few maxims to commit to memory:---- ...

Bertie's Box.
A very little boy by the name of "Bertie," kept a box in wh...

The Flower That Looks Up.
"What beautiful things flowers are," said one of the party ...

Good Companions.
One day, says a Persian poet, I saw a bunch of roses, and i...

Edward And Ellen.
Edward Ford owned a snug little cottage with a small farm s...

The Bit Of Garden.
Young children like to have a small piece of land for a gar...

A Boy Reproved By A Bird.
The sparrows often build their nests under the eaves of hou...

Asaph
About a hundred feet back from the main street of a village...

The Child And Flower.
The Atheist in his garden stood, At twilight's pen...

Pleasant Play.
There are many plays in which children may amuse themselves...

The Philosophy Of Relative Existences
In a certain summer, not long gone, my friend Bentley and I...

Arthur And His Apple Tree.
One summer day little William was sitting in the garden cha...

The Golden Crown.
A teacher once asked a child, "If you had a golden crown, w...

The Grey Old Cottage.
In the valley between "Longbrigg" and "Highclose," in the f...

The Plum Boys.
Two boys were one day on their way from school, and as they...

Jane And Her Lessons.
It is a mark of a good scholar to be prompt and studious. S...



THE EXPLANATION.








Lettice's father was a man of education, a scholar, a gentleman, and
had much power in preaching. He received one hundred and ten pounds
per year for his services. Her father's illness was long and painful,
and the family were dependant on others for assistance.

"We at last closed his eyes," said Lettice, "in deep sorrow." He used
to say to himself, "It is a rough road, but it leads to a good place."

After his funeral, the expenses exhausted all that was left of their
money--only a few pounds were left when the furniture was sold, and
"we were obliged," said Lettice, "to give up the dear little
parsonage. It was a sweet little place. The house was covered all over
with honeysuckles and jessamines; and there was the flower garden in
which I used to work, and which made me so hale and strong, and aunt
Montague used to say I was worth a whole bundle of fine ladies.

"It was a sad day when we parted from it. My poor mother! How she kept
looking back, striving not to cry, and poor Myra was drowned in tears.

"Then we afterwards came to London. A person whom we knew in the
village had a son who, was employed in one of the great linen
warehouses, and he promised to try to get us needlework. So we came to
London, took a small lodging, and furnished it with the remnant of our
furniture. Here we worked fourteen hours a day apiece, and we could
only gain between three and four shillings each. At last mother died,
and then all went; she died and had a pauper's funeral."

From this room the orphan girl removed soon after their mother's
deceased, and located among the poor of Marylebone street, where Mrs.
Danvers accidently met with the two sisters, in one of her visits
among the poor, and for whom she obtained the work which led to the
unexpected meeting related in the previous story.





Next: JONAS AND HIS HORSE.

Previous: OR THE UNEXPECTED MEETING.



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 3753


Untitled Document