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His Wife's Deceased Sister
It is now five years since an event occurred which so color...

Remember The Cake.
I will tell you an anecdote about Mrs. Hannah More, when sh...

Or The Unexpected Meeting.
I must tell you who were Lettice and Myra. They were the da...

My Early Days.
My father's house was indeed a pleasant home; and father wa...

The Boy And The Dew Drops.
A little boy who had been out early in the morning playing ...

Anna With A Pleasant Home.
Anna, having obtained leave of her mistress, soon found her...

The Bit Of Garden.
Young children like to have a small piece of land for a gar...

The Golden Crown.
A teacher once asked a child, "If you had a golden crown, w...

Telling Secrets.
There is a company of girls met together, and what can they...

Harvest Song.
Now the golden ear wants the reaper's hand, Banish eve...

Or, Honesty Rewarded.
At St. Petersburgh, the birth day of any of the royal famil...

Mother's Last Lesson.
"Will you please teach me my verse, mamma, and then kiss me...

The Way To Overcome Evil.
A little girl, by the name of Sarah Dean, was taught the pr...

A Good Act For Another.
A man was going from Norwich to New London with a loaded te...

The Saint's Rest.
We've no abiding city here: This may distress the wo...

Story About A Robber.
I will tell you a true story about a robber. A gentleman wa...

The Transferred Ghost
The country residence of Mr. John Hinckman was a delightful...

The Dying Boy.
A little boy, by the name of Bertie, was taken very ill, an...

The Uncertainty Of Life.
Josiah Martin was a young man of whom any mother might have...

The Philosophy Of Relative Existences
In a certain summer, not long gone, my friend Bentley and I...



THE EXPLANATION.








Lettice's father was a man of education, a scholar, a gentleman, and
had much power in preaching. He received one hundred and ten pounds
per year for his services. Her father's illness was long and painful,
and the family were dependant on others for assistance.

"We at last closed his eyes," said Lettice, "in deep sorrow." He used
to say to himself, "It is a rough road, but it leads to a good place."

After his funeral, the expenses exhausted all that was left of their
money--only a few pounds were left when the furniture was sold, and
"we were obliged," said Lettice, "to give up the dear little
parsonage. It was a sweet little place. The house was covered all over
with honeysuckles and jessamines; and there was the flower garden in
which I used to work, and which made me so hale and strong, and aunt
Montague used to say I was worth a whole bundle of fine ladies.

"It was a sad day when we parted from it. My poor mother! How she kept
looking back, striving not to cry, and poor Myra was drowned in tears.

"Then we afterwards came to London. A person whom we knew in the
village had a son who, was employed in one of the great linen
warehouses, and he promised to try to get us needlework. So we came to
London, took a small lodging, and furnished it with the remnant of our
furniture. Here we worked fourteen hours a day apiece, and we could
only gain between three and four shillings each. At last mother died,
and then all went; she died and had a pauper's funeral."

From this room the orphan girl removed soon after their mother's
deceased, and located among the poor of Marylebone street, where Mrs.
Danvers accidently met with the two sisters, in one of her visits
among the poor, and for whom she obtained the work which led to the
unexpected meeting related in the previous story.





Next: JONAS AND HIS HORSE.

Previous: OR THE UNEXPECTED MEETING.



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