While working on a sermon the pastor heard a knock at his office door. "Come in," he invited. A sad-looking man in threadbare clothes came in, pulling a large pig on a rope. "Can I talk to you for a minute?" asked the ma... Read more of On Marriage: One-Liners at Free Jokes.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Short Stories

Agnes And The Mouse.
One brilliant Christmas day, two little girls were walking ...

Mother's Last Lesson.
"Will you please teach me my verse, mamma, and then kiss me...

Gather The Flowers.
Two little girls went into the fields to gather flowers. Bu...

The Plum Boys.
Two boys were one day on their way from school, and as they...

The Uncertainty Of Life.
Josiah Martin was a young man of whom any mother might have...

Julia's Sunset Walk.
It was a beautiful June day, just at the sun's setting, whe...

A Good Act For Another.
A man was going from Norwich to New London with a loaded te...

The Child And Flower.
The Atheist in his garden stood, At twilight's pen...

The Philosophy Of Relative Existences
In a certain summer, not long gone, my friend Bentley and I...

Anecdotes.
A poor Arabian of the desert was one day asked, how he came...

The Two Robins.
A few summers ago I was sitting on a garden seat, beneath a...

Chinese Proverbs.
What is told in the ear is often heard a hundred miles. ...

Anne Cleaveland.
Anne was the daughter of a wealthy farmer. She had a good N...

Lizzy And Her Dog.
I wish to relate to you a very affecting story about a good...

The Market Day.
Mrs. Ford had three little children--Lily, Hetty, and a dea...

Arthur And His Apple Tree.
One summer day little William was sitting in the garden cha...

Anna Seeking Employment.
It was a wearisome day to poor Anna, as she walked from squ...

A Good Mother.
Mrs. Savage was the eldest sister of Matthew Henry. When sh...

The Echo.
Little Charles knew nothing about an echo. As he was playin...

Remember The Cake.
I will tell you an anecdote about Mrs. Hannah More, when sh...



THE DYING BOY.








A little boy, by the name of Bertie, was taken very ill, and for
sometime continued to grow weaker until he died. A few hours before
his death he revived up, and his first request was to be bathed in the
river; but his mother persuaded him to be sponged only, as the river
water would be too cold for his weak frame. After his mother had
sponged him with water, he desired to be dressed; when his mother
dressed him in his green coat and white collar, and seated him at the
table with all his books and worldly treasures around him. As he sat
there, one would have thought that he was about to commence a course
of study; and yet in the marble paleness of his features, and in the
listless and languid eye, there was evidence that life in the boy was
like an expiring taper, flickering in the socket. He soon asked to go
out in his little carriage. His grandfather, whom he very much loved,
placed him in it, and carefully avoiding every stone, drew him to a
spot commanding the entire landscape. The tide was up and the sun was
shining on the deep blue waters, and bathing the distant mountains and
the green meadows in liquid gold. The gardens and orchards around were
gay in the rich crimson blossoms of the apple tree; the air was filled
with the sweet fragrance of flowers, and the birds were singing
beautifully, when little Bertie looked for the last time on the scenes
of earth. He could not remain long, and was soon taken back to the
little parlor, where he sat on the sofa, resting his elbows on the
table. It was not long before the little boy died. But he was very
happy. Among his last words were these, addressed to his little sister
three years old: "Well, Emmie, very ill--me going to Jesus."

"Oh, mamma, Emmie loves her Saviour."





Next: THE BOY AND THE GOLD ROBIN.




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