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Anecdotes.
TRUE BENIFICENCE.--Mark Antony, when very much depressed, a...

The Two Robins.
A few summers ago I was sitting on a garden seat, beneath a...

Harvest Song.
Now the golden ear wants the reaper's hand, Banish eve...

The Parting Scene.
In one of our western cities was a poor woman, in the garre...

Or, Honesty Rewarded.
At St. Petersburgh, the birth day of any of the royal famil...

Story About An Indian.
A poor sick man might go to the door of some rich person's ...

Or The Unexpected Meeting.
I must tell you who were Lettice and Myra. They were the da...

The Glow Worm.
On a summer's evening about half an hour after bed time, as...

Pledge.
Our hands and our hearts we give To the temperance p...

Margaret And Herbert.
In a large family there are often diversity of character an...

The First Dollar.
I will tell you an affecting story about a young lad by the...

Benny's First Drawing.
You have perhaps heard of Benjamin West, the celebrated art...

The Flower That Looks Up.
"What beautiful things flowers are," said one of the party ...

The Shepherd And His Bible.
A poor shepherd, living among the Alps, the father of a lar...

The Brother And Sister.
(In three Stories.) ...

The Boy And The Gold Robin.
A bright eyed boy was sleeping upon a bank of blossoming cl...

Telling Secrets.
There is a company of girls met together, and what can they...

The Happy Family.
There are a great many novel sights in the streets of Londo...

The Dying Boy.
A little boy, by the name of Bertie, was taken very ill, an...

Julia's Sunset Walk.
It was a beautiful June day, just at the sun's setting, whe...



THE DYING BOY.








A little boy, by the name of Bertie, was taken very ill, and for
sometime continued to grow weaker until he died. A few hours before
his death he revived up, and his first request was to be bathed in the
river; but his mother persuaded him to be sponged only, as the river
water would be too cold for his weak frame. After his mother had
sponged him with water, he desired to be dressed; when his mother
dressed him in his green coat and white collar, and seated him at the
table with all his books and worldly treasures around him. As he sat
there, one would have thought that he was about to commence a course
of study; and yet in the marble paleness of his features, and in the
listless and languid eye, there was evidence that life in the boy was
like an expiring taper, flickering in the socket. He soon asked to go
out in his little carriage. His grandfather, whom he very much loved,
placed him in it, and carefully avoiding every stone, drew him to a
spot commanding the entire landscape. The tide was up and the sun was
shining on the deep blue waters, and bathing the distant mountains and
the green meadows in liquid gold. The gardens and orchards around were
gay in the rich crimson blossoms of the apple tree; the air was filled
with the sweet fragrance of flowers, and the birds were singing
beautifully, when little Bertie looked for the last time on the scenes
of earth. He could not remain long, and was soon taken back to the
little parlor, where he sat on the sofa, resting his elbows on the
table. It was not long before the little boy died. But he was very
happy. Among his last words were these, addressed to his little sister
three years old: "Well, Emmie, very ill--me going to Jesus."

"Oh, mamma, Emmie loves her Saviour."





Next: THE BOY AND THE GOLD ROBIN.




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