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Flora And Her Portrait.
"And was there never a portrait of your beautiful child," s...

Harriet And Her Squirrel.
It was on a Sabbath eve, when at a friend's house, we were ...

Asaph
About a hundred feet back from the main street of a village...

The Grey Old Cottage.
In the valley between "Longbrigg" and "Highclose," in the f...

A Boy Reproved By A Bird.
The sparrows often build their nests under the eaves of hou...

Edward And Ellen.
Edward Ford owned a snug little cottage with a small farm s...

A Tale Of Negative Gravity
My wife and I were staying at a small town in northern Ital...

Lettice And Myra.
...

The Boy And The Dew Drops.
A little boy who had been out early in the morning playing ...

The Portrait Of Flora Purchased.
Anna started for her home, and when she had arrived, she sl...

Old Pipes And The Dryad
A mountain brook ran through a little village. Over the bro...

Young Usher.
You have read of that remarkable man, Mr. Usher, who was Ar...

A Scene In London.
My young readers may have heard about the poor people in Lond...

The Remarkable Wreck Of The Thomas Hyke
It was half-past one by the clock in the office of the Regi...

Telling Secrets.
There is a company of girls met together, and what can they...

Mother's Last Lesson.
"Will you please teach me my verse, mamma, and then kiss me...

The Motherless Birds.
There were two men who were neighbors to each other, living...

The Bracelet;
...

My Early Days.
My father's house was indeed a pleasant home; and father wa...

Flying The Kite.
Flying the kite is a pleasant amusement for boys, and when ...



STORY ABOUT AN INDIAN.








A poor sick man might go to the door of some rich person's house and
ask relief for himself and not be able to obtain admittance; but if he
brought in his hand a paper written by the son of the master of the
house, whom he had met with in a distant land, and in his name asked
for the relief, his request would be granted for the sake of the
master's son.

Now we all need friends and every one tries to get and keep a few
friends. Children will love a little dog, or a lamb, or a dove, or a
bird. The little boy will talk to his top, and the little girl will
talk to her doll, which shows that they want a friend; and if the top
and doll could talk and love them, they would feel happier.

Some years ago there was an Indian in the State of Maine, who for his
very good conduct had a large farm given him by the State. He built
his little house on his land, and there lived. The white people about
did not treat him so kindly as they ought. His only child was taken
sick and died, and none of the whites went to comfort him, or to
assist him in burying his little child. Soon after, he went to the
white people, and said to them--"When white man's child die, Indian
may be sorry--he help bury him--when my child die, no one speak to
me--I make his grave alone. I can no live here, for I have no friend
to love me."

The poor Indian gave up his farm, dug up the body of his child, and
carried it with him 200 miles through the forest, to join the Canada
Indians.

The Indian loved his child, and he wanted friends. So you children
will need a friend to look to every day. When we are sick, in
distress, or about to die, we want a friend in whom we may trust and
be happy.



Wherefore did God create passions within us, pleasures round about
us, but that these, rightly tempered, are the very ingredients of
virtue.--_Milton_.





Next: GATHER THE FLOWERS.

Previous: THE HAPPY FAMILY.



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