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Famous Stories

Mignon
Here is the story of Mignon as I remember having read it in...

The Blind Men And The Elephant
There were once six blind men who stood by the road-side ev...

A Laconic Answer
Many miles beyond Rome there was a famous country which we ...

King Canute On The Seashore
A hundred years or more after the time of Alfred the Great ...

Other Wise Men Of Gotham
One day, news was brought to Gotham that the king was comin...

How Napoleon Crossed The Alps
About a hundred years ago there lived a great gen-er-al who...

The Miller Of The Dee
Once upon a time there lived on the banks of the River Dee ...

The Ungrateful Soldier
Here is another story of the bat-tle-field, and it is much ...

Damon And Pythias
A young man whose name was Pyth'i-as had done something whi...

The Endless Tale
In the Far East there was a great king who had no work to d...

The Story Of Cincinnatus
There was a man named Cin-cin-na'tus who lived on a little ...

Whittington And His Cat
The City There was once a little boy whose name was Rich...

George Washington And His Hatchet
When George Wash-ing-ton was quite a little boy, his father...

Horatius At The Bridge
Once there was a war between the Roman people and the E-tru...

The Sword Of Damocles
There was once a king whose name was Di-o-nys'i-us. He was ...

Sir Humphrey Gilbert
More than three hundred years ago there lived in England a ...

Androclus And The Lion
In Rome there was once a poor slave whose name was An'dro-c...

Arnold Winkelried
A great army was marching into Swit-zer-land. If it should ...

He Never Smiled Again
The bark that held the prince went down, The sweep...

Julius Caesar
Nearly two thousand years ago there lived in Rome a man who...



ALEXANDER AND BUCEPHALUS








One day King Philip bought a fine horse called Bu-ceph'a-lus. He was a
noble an-i-mal, and the king paid a very high price for him. But he
was wild and savage, and no man could mount him, or do anything at all
with him.

They tried to whip him, but that only made him worse. At last the king
bade his servants take him away.

"It is a pity to ruin so fine a horse as that," said Al-ex-an'der, the
king's young son. "Those men do not know how to treat him."

"Perhaps you can do better than they," said his father scorn-ful-ly.

"I know," said Al-ex-an-der, "that, if you would only give me leave to
try, I could manage this horse better than any one else."

"And if you fail to do so, what then?" asked Philip.

"I will pay you the price of the horse," said the lad.

While everybody was laughing, Alexander ran up to Bu-ceph-a-lus, and
turned his head toward the sun. He had noticed that the horse was
afraid of his own shadow.

He then spoke gently to the horse, and patted him with his hand. When
he had qui-et-ed him a little, he made a quick spring, and leaped upon
the horse's back.

Everybody expected to see the boy killed outright. But he kept his
place, and let the horse run as fast as he would. By and by, when
Bucephalus had become tired, Alexander reined him in, and rode back to
the place where his father was standing.

All the men who were there shouted when they saw that the boy had
proved himself to be the master of the horse.

He leaped to the ground, and his father ran and kissed him.

"My son," said the king, "Macedon is too small a place for you. You
must seek a larger kingdom that will be worthy of you."

After that, Alexander and Bucephalus were the best of friends. They
were said to be always together, for when one of them was seen, the
other was sure to be not far away. But the horse would never allow any
one to mount him but his master.

Alexander became the most famous king and warrior that was ever known;
and for that reason he is always called Alexander the Great.
Bucephalus carried him through many countries and in many fierce
battles, and more than once did he save his master's life.





Next: DIOGENES THE WISE MAN

Previous: THE UNGRATEFUL GUEST



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