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Casabianca
There was a great battle at sea. One could hear nothing but...

Maximilian And The Goose Boy
One summer day King Max-i-mil'ian of Ba-va'ri-a was walking...

Alexander And Bucephalus
One day King Philip bought a fine horse called Bu-ceph'a-lu...

Diogenes The Wise Man
At Cor-inth, in Greece, there lived a very wise man whose n...

Julius Caesar
Nearly two thousand years ago there lived in Rome a man who...

King Alfred And The Beggar
At one time the Danes drove King Alfred from his kingdom, a...

Socrates And His House
There once lived in Greece a very wise man whose name was S...

The Sword Of Damocles
There was once a king whose name was Di-o-nys'i-us. He was ...

Other Wise Men Of Gotham
One day, news was brought to Gotham that the king was comin...

The King And His Hawk
Gen'ghis Khan was a great king and war-rior. He led his ...

The Brave Three Hundred
All Greece was in danger. A mighty army, led by the great K...

The Barmecide Feast
There was once a rich old man who was called the Bar-me-cid...

The White Ship
King Henry, the Handsome Scholar, had one son, named Willia...

A Story Of Robin Hood
In the rude days of King Rich-ard and King John there were ...

Grace Darling
It was a dark Sep-tem-ber morning. There was a storm at sea...

The Black Douglas
In Scotland, in the time of King Robert Bruce, there lived ...

George Washington And His Hatchet
When George Wash-ing-ton was quite a little boy, his father...

The Ungrateful Guest
Among the soldiers of King Philip there was a poor man who ...

King Alfred And The Cakes
Many years ago there lived in Eng-land a wise and good ...

King Canute On The Seashore
A hundred years or more after the time of Alfred the Great ...



ALEXANDER AND BUCEPHALUS








One day King Philip bought a fine horse called Bu-ceph'a-lus. He was a
noble an-i-mal, and the king paid a very high price for him. But he
was wild and savage, and no man could mount him, or do anything at all
with him.

They tried to whip him, but that only made him worse. At last the king
bade his servants take him away.

"It is a pity to ruin so fine a horse as that," said Al-ex-an'der, the
king's young son. "Those men do not know how to treat him."

"Perhaps you can do better than they," said his father scorn-ful-ly.

"I know," said Al-ex-an-der, "that, if you would only give me leave to
try, I could manage this horse better than any one else."

"And if you fail to do so, what then?" asked Philip.

"I will pay you the price of the horse," said the lad.

While everybody was laughing, Alexander ran up to Bu-ceph-a-lus, and
turned his head toward the sun. He had noticed that the horse was
afraid of his own shadow.

He then spoke gently to the horse, and patted him with his hand. When
he had qui-et-ed him a little, he made a quick spring, and leaped upon
the horse's back.

Everybody expected to see the boy killed outright. But he kept his
place, and let the horse run as fast as he would. By and by, when
Bucephalus had become tired, Alexander reined him in, and rode back to
the place where his father was standing.

All the men who were there shouted when they saw that the boy had
proved himself to be the master of the horse.

He leaped to the ground, and his father ran and kissed him.

"My son," said the king, "Macedon is too small a place for you. You
must seek a larger kingdom that will be worthy of you."

After that, Alexander and Bucephalus were the best of friends. They
were said to be always together, for when one of them was seen, the
other was sure to be not far away. But the horse would never allow any
one to mount him but his master.

Alexander became the most famous king and warrior that was ever known;
and for that reason he is always called Alexander the Great.
Bucephalus carried him through many countries and in many fierce
battles, and more than once did he save his master's life.





Next: DIOGENES THE WISE MAN

Previous: THE UNGRATEFUL GUEST



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